P:R Redesign: Tony Aros’ Wonder Woman!

Note: We’ve been getting more Justice League related redesigns than ever, and today’s entry rose to the top of the heap. In this design, Tony Aros reinterprets DC’s leading lady into a more classic approach harkening back to her Themiscyran roots. Tony’s thrown in alot of unique elements that play well with each other, and I’d love to see more of this design in action! Check below the art for Tony’s thoughts on the design, then go to his blog where he’s been busy redesigning the rest of the JLA as well as other heroes. – Chris A.

Here’s what Tony had to say about his approach:

With this redesign I was mainly trying to “de-cheezify” her a little bit, while keeping her both feminine and bad-ass.  I dropped the gold from her look because I just don’t like gold, and instead replaced it with silver.  Her toga signifies her Greek connection, as well as hearkening to the Amazonian practice of mastectomy.  I was mainly trying to imagine what an Amazonian warrior would want to wear to fight, and this is what I pictured.  I had a lot of fun with this one.

20 comments on “P:R Redesign: Tony Aros’ Wonder Woman!
  1. In my opinion, WonderWoman is just a crappy character with a crappy costume…
    That beeing said, I like this design… It would be interesting to see this version without the toga…

  2. Love the toga signifying the Amazons cutting a breast off to make them better archers. Also love the new helmet and the hair being up. Definitely more Greek.

  3. Cool design Bonus points for wanting to to “de-cheezify” her but minus several million for “the amazonian practice of mastectomy,” an annoying and misogynistic trope that undercuts your attempts to make her less of a sex kitten.

  4. There are elements of this I really enjoy – the boots especially, and the headgear, though I wish In could see it from head-on – but I keep trying to see the costume under the toga.

  5. For me, it’s a little too much. The strap/armor going over the shoulder makes he look more manly, the WW logo on the belt buckle, the headgear – it all seems like it wants to look futuristic and historical at the same time.

  6. Me:
    Cool design Bonus points for wanting to to “de-cheezify” her but minus several million for “the amazonian practice of mastectomy,” an annoying and misogynistic trope that undercuts your attempts to make her less of a sex kitten.

    Personally, I don’t find anything “sexy” about a woman cutting her breast off, so I’m confused as to how you think his allusion to mastectomy in his design “undercuts his attempts to make her less of a sex kitten.” If anything, the fact that Diana did not remove her breast could be seen as empowering because it defies that tradition and trope.

    My favorite aspects of this design are the up-do versus typical flowing locks as well as the clever belt buckle embedded with her logo. Good job!

  7. I love the hair and the helmet. And the more subtle coloring.

    But… I would like to see it without the toga. It just feels a little thrown over a really interesting design.

  8. Timberoo:
    For me, it’s a little too much. The strap/armor going over the shoulder makes he look more manly, the WW logo on the belt buckle, the headgear – it all seems like it wants to look futuristic and historical at the same time.

    Same here. Aside from the cluttered design elements, it also just doesn’t stand out as that different from any other WW redesign I’ve seen.

  9. The biggest hit agains the mastectomy thing, aside from its being a myth (can’t have myths in comic books after all) is that she very evidently has two breasts, so design-wise the toga thing is not in fact hearkening to it.

    It’s a nice design and I like the colours, but if it was going for focus on Amazon warrior I don’t quite see why she still has the lasso. I’d actually be more interested to see a design for Wonder Woman that was based on actual female warriors relevant to the Ancient Greek world (that would be the Scythians), rather than recycling Greco-Roman tropes.

  10. @BobDobolina: He means that it suggests the practice, by exposing one breast to a much greater degree than the other.

    The toga ruins it for me, but without it the costume is very similar to several other redesigns this site has featured.

  11. BobDobolina:
    (can’t have myths in comic books after all)

    Thor is a myth. Capt. Marvel’s magic word is all about myth. Superman is an allegory of Christian mythology. You’re confusing myths and falsehoods.

  12. Thor is a myth. Capt. Marvel’s magic word is all about myth. Superman is an allegory of Christian mythology.

    And the Amazons and Greek Gods of Wonder Woman’s background are myth. Tony Aros is correct that the mastectomy is in fact part of the Amazon myth. There is no “historical evidence” about the Amazons having mastectomies because the Amazons were not historical.

  13. My point, Bob, is that this wasn’t part of the myth. It’s not written about in any of the ancient sources that mention Amazons. It was a misunderstanding on the part of later readers and conjecture about the meaning of the name. It has nothing to do with the myth itself. It lends nothing to the myth. It’s just false, yet it gets repeated. And before you claim that myths evolve, I’d no sooner accept change through ignorance than I would Disney additions to popular myths.

  14. My point, Bob, is that this wasn’t part of the myth.

    Sure it is. It just wasn’t part of the original myth. Myths are stories. They evolve and change, new people take them over and translate and mistranslate them and use them for their own purposes. That doesn’t make them wrong, because there was simply no objectively-correct original to compare them to. Objecting to this is like objecting to the existence of the New Testament because the Gospels were not the original teachings about Jesus — which all put Old Testament quotes in his mouth — or for that matter objecting to the (canonical) Hadiths because they were not in the Koran, or objecting to the existence of Advaita Vedanta because its teachings don’t appear in the Vedas. That all of these things weren’t original is evident, but also almost completely irrelevant to whether they are actually part of the myth.

    On such matters, The Straight Dope is not in fact a particularly trustworthy source of information. I’m sorry, but it just isn’t.

  15. (I would add that to whatever extent the Amazon myth ties into misogyny, further to some claims here — and it most assuredly does — it has about zilch to do with the mastectomy element of the myth [an element of the story which in fact is used by modern breast-cancer survivor group as a means of identification; the real measure of a myth is in the uses it's put to in a contemporary context]. The misogyny has rather to do with “Amazonomachy,” the use of Amazons as a world-turned-upside-down trope in Greek myth which was inevitably righted by the appearance of a correctly masculine hero on the scene to conquer the unruly females; the kind of trope that was charmingly lampooned by modern movies like Amazon Women on the Moon. Whatever my other disagreements with Tony in the design, he doesn’t fall foul of that AFAICS.)

  16. ((And finally, supposing we were to take “originality” of myths more to heart: would you contend that the Marvel version of Thor is genuinely consistent with Norse myth? Or that “Shazam!” has something to do with some actual mythical wizard in some actual human culture of Ancient Egypt (Shazam’s natural environment]? Or that Superman is reconciliable with some form of Christian theology [which would seem unlikely, given that his creators were Jewish and he was likely conceived as an analogue of the Golem... or maybe I've just been reading too much Michael Chabon?]? Because if you wouldn’t claim any of these things, it seems bizarre to hold comic-book Amazons to a different standard… doesn’t it?))

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