She-Design/He-Design: Yasmine Putri’s Captain America!

Note: We’ve seen female itterations of Captain America before in alternate universes and some great cosplay, but I’d say Yasmine Putri takes the cake with this. Although I’d like to see her with a mask/helmet of some sort, everything else reads as excellent and true to the heritage of the mantle. – Chris A.

29 comments on “She-Design/He-Design: Yasmine Putri’s Captain America!
  1. Love it! The shift from vertical to horizontal stripes on the torso works well with the female shape, and I absolutely love those gloves.

  2. This is gorgeous. The bare arms really add to the sense that she is hella strong, and the short skirt she’s wearing adds to the element that she’s a woman from the 40s, and some conventions of femininity had to be upheld.

    Seriously, it’s almost jaw-dropping how good-looking this is.

  3. Absolutely amazing. I love/hate how she’s resolved the abdomen area -love it because I draw it in an extremely similar fashion anytime someone asks me to do a personal rendition of Cap,, hate it because she nailed it, unlike me. I’ve always loved Cap’s general aesthetics, but feel several small elements would work better with some tweaks.

    Check Yasmine’s rendition of a feminine Thor in her devianart, i’s also amazing. Wonderful, wonderful artist.

  4. This a fantastic piece of art. I love the torso design, a very interesting interpretation of the stripes-straps motif. I too would like to see a helmet/mask of some sort.
    Not so sure about the limbs. The gloves look uncomfortable and excessively bulky (and what we can see of her legs suggests that she’s wearing equally long and bulky boots – oh dear!).
    Also, there’s the perennial question of skin: I know that – being a female version of Steve – she’s impervious and whatnot, so she technically doesn’t need padding or covering ALL OVER her body. And yet, why has Steve always worn full-body, padded and often armoured suits? If this is supposed to be Steve as a woman, wouldn’t he/she wear the same sort of outfit?
    Now, I realise a little bit of shoulder isn’t much to grumble about, but at the same time I can’t help wondering when this ‘female character-showing of skin’ association is ever going to disappear. I might be overthinking things, anyway. Maybe this ‘Stephanie Rogers’ is simply less tolerant of under-arm chafing than Steve is :D
    At least she doesn’t have a bare midriff!

  5. One of my favourite trends in comics reinventions / cosplay in recent years is this free gender swapping. Why not?

    Beautiful drawing and design, this could be Marvel’s Wonder Woman

  6. I like the visual suggestion that this is a modernization of her ’40s stage outfit (assuming that this is MCU Captain America), which would naturally have included a skirt. I would cover the shoulders with the same material as on her chest, though, presuming that it’s some kind of super-science flexy armor.

  7. The picture is really amazing and impressive, but I think the design itself is mediocre. If this was a design for a character appearing in Captain America Comics, yeah, ok why not. But if this is a he/she design, I find this suit not reminiscent enough of Captain America’s. Nothing really scream he/she design, but it just tells me “a girl with a suit loosely based on the original”.
    The worst thing for me it the skirt. She has very practical objects all over her body, the belt, the gloves, a weapon, etc.. but she still have the caricatural feminin touch. Awh… it hurts. It’s unlogical to me when I look at the entire outfit, and second, I find it caricatural to add a skirt to make it a “she” design.
    But like I said, the piece of art itself is pretty excellent, the mood, the face, proportions, really amazing art.

  8. I think it’s great. But I still would have preferred to see a helmet/mask and her shoulders armoured up. If popular entertainment has taught us anything heroes are more likely to be shot in the shoulder than any other part of the body.

  9. “Now, I realise a little bit of shoulder isn’t much to grumble about, but at the same time I can’t help wondering when this ‘female character-showing of skin’ association is ever going to disappear.”

    I don’t think it should disappear. Comics are not about practicality, they are about appeal, and showing skin can be a part of that.

  10. I love the muscle on this! A lot of artists would draw a bikini model and expect the audience to accept that she’s as tough as Cap, but Yasmine’s take here is believably built. Not sure I like the exposed arms, but otherwise great.

  11. Casey: “Now, I realise a little bit of shoulder isn’t much to grumble about, but at the same time I can’t help wondering when this ‘female character-showing of skin’ association is ever going to disappear.”I don’t think it should disappear.Comics are not about practicality, they are about appeal, and showing skin can be a part of that.

    So you’re saying (leaving aside this particular redesign, but focusing on the association in general) we should keep having female characters showing skin, regardless of practicality or character/personality, because of a need to appeal? Appeal to who? Horny teenagers?
    I wasn’t addressing practicality, anyway: I was talking about this broad association.
    Going back to this redesign, Alex brought up the very valid point of the completely stereotypical skirt. Why does the changing of Steve’s gender from male to female immediately require bare shoulders and a skirt? Presumably she’s still a super-SOLDIER, yes? I agree with Alex, that the only way I can appreciate this work is as “a girl with a suit loosely based on the original” rather than a proper he/she redesign.

  12. Casey: “Now, I realise a little bit of shoulder isn’t much to grumble about, but at the same time I can’t help wondering when this ‘female character-showing of skin’ association is ever going to disappear.”I don’t think it should disappear.Comics are not about practicality, they are about appeal, and showing skin can be a part of that.

    It’s not a question of “practicality,” it’s a question of internal storytelling logic. And, logically, it makes no sense for male street level crime-fighters to wear kelvar and chain mail when fighting gun-toting mobsters and sword-wielding ninjas, while female characters at the same level dress like they’re going to prom. Establishing and maintaining reasonably consistent rules about how a fictional world works is a vitally important element in making that world believable. And building believable fictional worlds is what writing comics is actually about.

    That aside . . .

    I really like both the design of the costume and the illustration itself. Nice work.

  13. Showing the shoulders does a lot of good to show that muscle. It shows us that she’s built like a super soldier. Her outfit, sans skirt really isn’t that different from a lot of sleeveless male heroes, so bare arms aren’t going to make me scream in hate. I do, however, feel like there should have been a helmet to really bring home the soldier aspect. I’m also not averse to throwing in some shoulder armor for ramming things.

    Currently geeking over the shield though

  14. Only thing I dislike is the skirt. Sure, it works for when she’s doing one of those WW2 Liberty shows, but not for actual combat.
    I actually kinda like the bare arms, just because they show that she’s ripped, not a stick-thin model, which is awesome. She looks strong and attractive, which is how all female superheroes should look!

  15. While I often wish women’s costumes were less sexualized, I think the bare shoulders are important here – it shows off her muscles in a way that, especially in the art style here, full sleeves would not.

    I think the costume would need an optional motorcycle jacket or something similar for practicality, but from a pure design perspective, this is amazing.

  16. The whole “her bare arms show off her muscles” argument doesn’t really hold, since superhero costumes are, for the most part, drawn like body paint, with every muscle ripple plainly evident. Coloring her arms blue would do nothing to obscure the heft of her shoulders.

  17. The illustration is far better than the design. But on the plus note, skirts have been used in far more conflicts than pants in human history. One thing people tend to forget is that regardless of gun use, superheroes do a lot more of melee and hand to hand battle, and their outfits would certainly have cues from the past, from warriors that didn’t rely on guns, vehicles and drones for combat.

  18. kalorama: The whole “her bare arms show off her muscles” argument doesn’t really hold, since superhero costumes are, for the most part, drawn like body paint, with every muscle ripple plainly evident. Coloring her arms blue would do nothing to obscure the heft of her shoulders.

    Which would make sense as an argument if this blog and several mainstream comics weren’t moving away from that trend. Also, covered shoulders could be argued to be padded. There is not making that mistake here. Plus, the bare arms to a lot to make her design dynamic

  19. I could easily see this costume on a grown-up American Dream (Shannon Carter), or an AU genderbent Cap (Stephanie Rogers?). Although the bare shoulders seem a bit off for a character that is vulnerable to bullets and knives. How about a compromise: armor up one arm, and keep the shield arm bare, since it’s usually protected anyway. The comic book explanation could be “having too much weight on that arm throws off my aim.”

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